Winchester, Hampshire

Mathematical Gazetteer of the British Isles


Winchester has one of England's oldest schools, founded by William of Wykeham (1324-1404), Bishop of Winchester who also founded New College, Oxford. He is buried in the Chantry Chapel of the Cathedral. [1]
See THIS LINK

Samuel Morland, G.H. Hardy and W.S. Gosset ("Student") were students here [2].
Hardy was first in the scholarship competition in 1890, but the school treated him so atrociously that he never returned nor attended a reunion. Indeed, he would never eat mutton, which the school served five days per week [3].
C.V. Durell was mathematics master from 1905 until his retirement in the 1940s [4].
C.H.O'D. (Hugh) Alexander taught mathematics here c1930.
Freeman J. Dyson was a student to 1941 [5].
The puzzle writer, Eric Revell Emmet, was a teacher here.

Wren designed a palace for Charles II at Winchester and construction started in 1683, but was abandoned on the King's death in 1685. The half-finished building was used as a barracks, but burned down in the 1890s. [6]


References (show)

  1. Greenwood, Douglas. Who's Buried Where in England. (1982); 2nd ed., Constable, London, 1990, pp.164-165 with photo on p.165.
  2. Sandon, F. Review of Student's Collected Papers. Math. Gaz. 27 (1943) 225-226.
  3. Kanigel, Robert. The Man Who Knew Infinity. A Life of the Genius Ramanujan. (Scribner's, NY, 1991); Abacus (Little, Brown & Co. (UK)), London, 1992. pp.112, 120, 124
  4. Maxwell, Edwin A. Obituary: Clement Vavasour Durell. Math. Gaz. 53 (No. 385) (Oct 1969) 312-313.
  5. Kanigel, Robert. The Man Who Knew Infinity. A Life of the Genius Ramanujan. (Scribner's, NY, 1991); Abacus (Little, Brown & Co. (UK)), London, 1992. pp.339 & 368
  6. Summerson, John. Sir Christopher Wren. Brief Lives, Collins, London, 1953. p.118

The Mathematical Gazetteer of the British Isles was created by David Singmaster.
The original site is at THIS LINK.